Clinical Trials

  • Principal Investigator:

    Andrew B. Lassman, MD
    The purpose of this research study is to see if the combination of medications approved for the treatment of glioblastoma, together with the study drug, selinexor (also known as XPOVIO), has any effects on your cancer. Selinexor works by trapping tumor suppressor proteins within the cell nucleus. This is expected to cause the cancer cells to die or stop growing. Selinexor is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use in certain patients with multiple myeloma but has not yet been approved by the FDA for the treatment of your type of cancer.
  • Principal Investigator:

    Fabio M. Iwamoto, MD
    The purpose of this study is to test whether using clindamycin and triamcinolone topical lotions canprevent skin-related side effects of tumor treating fields (TTFields). Clindamycin is an antibiotic. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. The FDA has approved the drug for the treatment of various bacterial infections. However, giving clindamycin to people to prevent skin-related side effects of TTFields is an investigational use of the drug. The FDA has not approved this use. Triamcinolone is a corticosteroid. It works by copying the effects of hormones that your body makes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Philip L. De Jager, MD, PHD
    We aim to identify new tools that will help us to achieve successful brain aging in the general population and in people with an underlying autoimmune disease. A critical aspect of this study is that we are looking for individuals who are willing to donate their brain and spinal cord when they pass away; this will enable the investigators to understand which molecules in the brain made someone more or less likely to age successfully. The brains will be housed at the New York Brain Bank. The study is primarily online, with online cognitive evaluations every three years. A subset of...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Fabio M. Iwamoto, MD
    The purpose of this study is to see how safe the study medicine, IGV-001 plus standard of care (SOC), is and to compare IGV-001 with placebo to see if it works in slowing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor regrowth. SOC refers to the usual medicine(s) or procedures used to treat your cancer. A placebo looks like the study medicine but does not contain any medication (active ingredient). Researchers use a placebo to see if a study medicine works better or is safer than not taking anything at all.
  • Principal Investigator:

    Philip L. De Jager, MD, PHD
    The Snapshot study aims to understand brain and spinal cord aging in healthy individuals and individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). We aim to identify new tools that will help us to achieve successful brain aging in the general population and in people with an underlying autoimmune disease. A critical aspect of this study is that we are looking for individuals who are willing to donate their brain and spinal cord when they pass away; this will enable the investigators to understand which molecules in the brain made someone more or less likely to age successfully. The brains will be housed...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Philip L. De Jager, MD, PHD
    MS Genetics aims to better understand the genetic component of demyelinating diseases by doing genetic testing on blood samples of participants. This study involves a one-time blood draw and completion of questionnaires spread out over a couple of years in hopes to better understand the genes that makes one predisposed to Multiple Sclerosis and various other demyelinating diseases.
  • Principal Investigator:

    Philip L. De Jager, MD, PHD
    We need your help today to gather information about the experience of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most MS patients take one of over a dozen of medications to control their disease, and these medications alter the immune system. These effects are not as strong as those experienced by patients with organ transplants or cancer patients on chemotherapy; however, we do not know today whether MS patients on medication are more susceptible to the virus. This study by the Columbia University MS Center in New York City aims to answer that...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Andrew B. Lassman, MD
    This study is being done to evaluate the safety and usefulness of the study drug, AG-881, as compared to placebo (a medically inactive substance) in residual or recurrent non-enhancing Grade 2 glioma (a type of brain cancer) that has a mutation in the IDH1 or IDH2 metabolic enzyme (a substance produced by the body to assist in breaking down chemicals). Subjects will be randomly assigned to receive either AG-881 or placebo in this study and will have a 50/50 chance of being assigned to either of the study groups. The subjects, study doctors, staff, and the Sponsor of the study will not know...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Fabio M. Iwamoto, MD
    The purpose of this study is to compare the usual radiation therapy and usual chemotherapy,temozolomide, to using the usual radiation therapy and usual chemotherapy plus thechemotherapy drug lomustine (Gleostine). Lomustine (Gleostine) is already approved by theFDA for use in brain tumors but it is usually used alone and is not the first-line choice formethylated MGMT tumors. Adding a second chemotherapy drug, lomustine (Gleostine), to usual chemotherapy and radiation therapy could extend your life or shrink or stabilize your cancer. But, it could also cause side effects, which the study team...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Fabio M. Iwamoto, MD
    The purpose of this study is to compare the usual radiation therapy and usual chemotherapy, temozolomide, to using the usual radiation therapy and usual chemotherapy plus the chemotherapy drug lomustine (Gleostine). Lomustine (Gleostine) is already approved by the FDA for use in brain tumors but it is usually used alone and is not the first-line choice for methylated MGMT tumors. Adding a second chemotherapy drug, lomustine (Gleostine), to usual chemotherapy and radiation therapy could extend your life or shrink or stabilize your cancer. But, it could also cause side effects, which the study...

Pages